Wake Forest 27587 Magazine

Summer 2019

The quarterly 27587 MAGAZINE is a must-read, in-you-hands publication that strives to give a deeper identity to rapidly growing Wake Forest, N.C. It highlights in-depth stories, targeting higher-income households.

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stories. the New Testament windows high overhead. do, you can read the Bible in here." e soaring tower – at 210 feet high – is said to be modeled after England's Canter- bury Cathedral, mother church of the world- But the connection ends there. And, despite the imposing stone likeness of John Wesley over the entrance to the nar- ecumenical, a "sanctuary for all people." era of segregation. "He was an African- stayed in Philadelphia." ere are other signatures on this place, 38 Summer 2019 | Wake Forest 27587 Magazine "e army, Roman imperialism, and war were not the only domain for him," Cleland — who would become the longest serving dean of the chapel — said from the altar. "ere was another realm, one of peace and goodwill, of grace." And today, there is perhaps no 'ner ca- thedral to experience the pull of that realm than Duke Chapel, whose neo-Gothic de- sign with its large stone piers, pointed arches, ribbed vaults, and •ying buttresses is no less revered to many than Notre Dame Cathedral — the site of Napoleon's 1804 coronation — is to Parisians. When that most sacred of worship spaces burned in a dramatic 're broadcast world- wide in April, the chapel's 50-bell carillon played La Marseillaise, the French national anthem, from the highest spot of what was known as Duke Forest when it was conceived in 1925. ere, so the story goes, James Buchanan Duke — accompanied by William Preston Few, whose college presidency straddled the new Duke University and its predecessor, Trinity College — paused and said: "Here's where it ought to be." And so, it came to be. Designed by Afri- can-American Julian Abele, then a promi- nent architect with Horace Trumbauer of Philadelphia, the Duke cathedral is majestic with its sculptures of such theologians as John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, and 77 stained-glass windows depicting biblical "is is my favorite: Jesus' accession into heaven," Lois Oliver, a retired pediatrician who today is the chapel's head docent, said of "If you have binoculars and nothing else to wide Anglican Communion, represented here by the Protestant Episcopal Church. thex, it is not wholly Methodist either, but "ere's nothing copied here. It's all Mr. Abele's design," Oliver said of a man who ap- parently never saw his own creation in the American, and it was Jim Crow time, and he such as the brass tablet just outside honoring John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, and 77 stained-glass windows depicting biblical stories. "is is my favorite: Jesus' accession into heaven," Lois Oliver, a retired pediatrician who today is the chapel's head docent, said of the New Testament windows high overhead. "If you have binoculars and nothing else to do, you can read the Bible in here." e soaring tower — at 210 feet high — is said to be modeled after England's Canter- bury Cathedral, mother church of the world- wide Anglican Communion, represented here by the Protestant Episcopal Church. But the connection ends there. And, despite the imposing stone likeness of John Wesley over the entrance to the nar- thex, it is not wholly Methodist either, but ecumenical, a "sanctuary for all people." "ere's nothing copied here. It's all Mr. Abele's design," Oliver said of a man who ap- parently never saw his own creation in the era of segregation. "He was an African- American, and it was Jim Crow time, and he stayed in Philadelphia." ere are other signatures on this place, such as the brass tablet just outside honoring Edwin Eugene Dacus (1873-1946) of the Hillsborough quarry that supplied the chapel's building blocks, said to feature 17 shades from rust orange to slate gray. Continued on Page 41 kk BOB KARP A sculpture of John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, is front and center as you approach Duke Chapel, whose namesake benefactors were devout Methodists.

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