Wake Forest 27587 Magazine

Spring 2019

The quarterly 27587 MAGAZINE is a must-read, in-you-hands publication that strives to give a deeper identity to rapidly growing Wake Forest, N.C. It highlights in-depth stories, targeting higher-income households.

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70 Spring 2019 | Wake Forest 27587 Magazine Part XIX Birder's Guide North Carolina is home to an abundance of bird species. Here are some of the more common varieties you can expect to spot within the Piedmont region PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF BRENDAN KLICK /CAROLINA BIRD CLUB EDITOR'S NOTE: The Carolina Bird Club, the pre-eminent group for birders in the Carolinas, was founded in 1937 and has more than 900 members. For more information, visit carolinabirdclub.org. SOURCES: The Audubon Society, adapted from Ken Kaufman's "Lives of North American Birds." audubon.org/bird-guide; The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, allaboutbirds.org Eastern Whip-poor-will (Antrostomus vociferous) Made famous in folk songs, poems, and literature for their endless chanting on summer nights, eastern whip-poor-wills are easy to hear but hard to see. Their brindled plumage blends perfectly with the gray-brown leaf litter of the open forests where they breed and roost. At dawn and dusk, and on moonlit nights, they sally out from perches to sweep up insects in their cavernous mouths. These common birds are on the decline in parts of their range as open forests are converted to suburbs or agriculture. Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) Most schoolchildren learn turkey identification early, by tracing outlines of their hands to make Thanksgiving cards. These big, spectacular birds are an increasingly common sight the rest of the year, too, as flocks stride around woods and clearings like miniature dinosaurs. The English name of the bird may be a holdover from early shipping routes that passed through the country of Turkey on their way to delivering the birds to European markets. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) The blue-gray gnatcatcher's grayish color and long tail, as well as the way it mixes snippets of other birds' repertoires into its own high, nasal songs, have earned it the nickname "Little Mockingbird." The breed's nesting range has been shifting northward since the early 20th Century, in concert with increasing average temperatures.

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